Steinhatchee

Spanish moss tumbles down from the cypress and cedar trees along the Steinhatchee River and egrets coast over the placid water. Hundreds of miles of moss-draped country roads and bike trails invite contemplative drives and adventurous explorations.

The city of Steinhatchee is a complacent fishing community that has retained its pristine natural surroundings and serenity for over a century. The Steinhatchee River is renowned for its surplus of trout and redfish, as the river’s uncongested waters challenge the most skilled anglers. The river also has a deep water port adequate for larger vessels and off-shore fishing excursions.

Things to do in Steinhatchee, Florida

Recreational scalloping is in season during the summer and Steinhatchee reigns as bay scallop capital. Scallop charters are easy to find and many restaurants will prepare your catch.

Canoeing on the small Steinhatchee River, hiking trails, hilly biking, surrounding small beach towns, and friendly and flavorful seafood restaurants provide sightseeing rewards.

Steinhatchee combines the ambiance of the 19th century with the conveniences of the 20th. Victorian waterfront homes line the shores and footpaths and gardens sequester the surroundings. Steinhatchee is often referred to as “The Best Kept Secret in Florida.”

Cedar Keys National Wildlife Refuge

For birding and wildlife enthusiasts, thirteen offshore islands designated as wilderness areas provide spectacular and rare viewing opportunities. Most of the keys are tiny, but the two most important for visitors are Atsena Otie Key, which is about a mile from the dock in Cedar Key, and Sea Horse Key. Fishing and swimming on the beach are unquestionably highlights of any vacation.

Cedar Key Museum State Park

During the nineteenth century, Cedar Key on Florida’s Gulf Coast was a thriving port city with a railroad connection. Exhibits in the museum depict the city’s colorful history during that time period. Sea shells and Indian artifacts collected by Saint Clair Whitman, the founder of Cedar Key’s first museum, are included in the collection. Whitman’s house is in the park and has been restored to look like it did in the 1920s. Visitors can see wildlife and birds, as well as native vegetation, on a short nature trail. On the museum grounds and along the walking trail, you can see small gray squirrels, doves, mockingbirds, blue jays, woodpeckers, and green tree frogs.

Waterfront Boardwalk

Restaurants, ice cream shops, and arts and crafts stores Excursions to Lighthouse Key and the other islands in this chain are also available from here. There’s a good chance you’ll see some dolphins.

Florida Saltwater Flats Fishing Charters

Fishing on the flats inshore. Scallop trips are also available. Pricing is available in four, six, and eight hour increments to accommodate a variety of group sizes. The price is for the boat for two people, plus an additional fee per person up to four for fishing and six for scalloping. We provide everything except what you want to eat and drink. We have a license and are insured. On most days, we will launch from the Steinhatchee River and will be in less than 4 feet of water. The Big Bend has a fantastic fishery as well as some spectacular unspoiled Florida scenery. Our boats range in size from 22 to 24 flats.

Steinhatchee Falls

Steinhatchee Falls, located on the outskirts of town, is without a doubt one of North Florida’s most beautiful spots. Just a short drive north on Hwy 51 will bring you to this secluded paradise, where kayaks can be launched as it feeds back into the Steinhatchee River, or you can simply fish from its banks and enjoy the view.

Steinhatchee Falls is an excellent spot for a picnic or a quiet moment watching the river cascade over the falls. The three-foot waterfall is formed by a limerock outcropping in the river that runs north of the falls and served as a crossing point for Native Americans and settlers in the 1800s. Before bridges, this was a vehicle crossing. The flat natural bridge extends entirely across the river, and the water is only a few inches deep on top of the flat rock shelf. There are still traces of the old road.